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Monday
Jan242011

Richard Florida and Katherine Perez -the Future City

   

Richard Florida (Radio Show Feb 26,2011 US 7PM West Coast 10PM East Aus Feb 27 Sydney 2PM or Go to dowloads page for Florida podcast download)

The creative class: a fast-growing, highly educated, and well-paid segment of the workforce on whose efforts corporate profits and economic growth increasingly depend. Members of the creative class do a wide variety of work in a wide variety of industries—-from technology to entertainment, journalism to finance, high-end manufacturing to the arts. They do not consciously think of themselves as a class. Yet they share a common ethos that values creativity, individuality, difference, and merit.

Large Cities Creativity Rankings

Rankings of 49 metro areas reporting populations over 1 million in the 2000 Census

Top Ten Cities

City

Creativity
Index

%Creative
Workers

Creative
Rank

High-Tech
Rank

Innovation
Rank

Diversity
Rank

1. San Francisco

1057

34.8

5

1

2

1

2. Austin

1028

36.4

4

11

3

16

3. San Diego

1015

32.1

15

12

7

3

3. Boston

1015

38.0

3

2

6

22

5. Seattle

1008

32.7

9

3

12

8

6. Chapel Hill

996

38.2

2

14

4

28

7. Houston

980

32.5

10

16

16

10

8. Washington

964

38.4

1

5

30

12

9. New York

962

32.3

12

13

24

14

10. Dallas

960

30.2

23

6

17

9

10. Minneapolis

960

33.9

7

21

5

29

 

Bottom Ten Cities

City

Creativity
Index

%Creative
Workers

Creative
Rank

High-Tech
Rank

Innovation
Rank

Diversity
Rank

49. Memphis

530

24.8

47

48

42

41

48. Norfolk, VA

555

28.4

36

35

49

47

47. Las Vegas

561

18.5

49

42

47

5

46. Buffalo

609

28.9

33

40

27

49

45. Louisville

622

26.5

46

46

39

36

44. Grand Rapids

639

24.3

48

43

23

38

43. Oklahoma City

668

29.4

29

41

43

39

42. New Orleans

668

27.5

42

45

48

13

41. Greensboro

697

27.3

44

33

35

35

40. Providence

698

27.6

41

44

34

33

 

More and more businesses understand that ethos and are making the adaptations necessary to attract and retain creative class employees—-everything from relaxed dress codes, flexible schedules, and new work rules in the office to hiring recruiters who throw Frisbees. Most civic leaders, however, have failed to understand that what is true for corporations is also true for cities and regions: Places that succeed in attracting and retaining creative class people prosper; those that fail don’t.

Stuck in old paradigms of economic development, cities like Buffalo, New Orleans, and Louisville struggled in the 1980s and 1990s to become the next “Silicon Somewhere” by building generic high-tech office parks or subsidizing professional sports teams. Yet they lost members of the creative class, and their economic dynamism, to places like Austin, Boston, Washington, D.C. and Seattle—-places more tolerant, diverse, and open to creativity. Because of this migration of the creative class, a new social and economic geography is emerging in America, one that does not correspond to old categories like East Coast versus West Coast or Sunbelt versus Frostbelt. Rather, it is more like the class divisions that have increasingly separated Americans by income and neighborhood, extended into the realm of city and region.

 

 

 

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Florida&Perez Feb 26,2011 right click for download